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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Versus The Machine.

“Come gather ’round people
Wherever you roam
And admit that the waters
Around you have grown
And accept it that soon
You’ll be drenched to the bone.
If your time to you
Is worth savin’
Then you better start swimmin’
Or you’ll sink like a stone
For the times they are a-changin’.

Come senators, congressmen
Please heed the call
Don’t stand in the doorway
Don’t block up the hall
For he that gets hurt
Will be he who has stalled
There’s a battle outside
And it is ragin’.
It’ll soon shake your windows
And rattle your walls
For the times they are a-changin’.”

— Bob Dylan

— The Times They Are A-Changin’

“Let’s not get carried away.”

— Nancy Pelosi on being asked about Alexandria Casio-Cortez

 

Multiple narratives are colliding. In a country as large as America it makes sense. The collision of divergent narratives exposes the Orwellian power of the establishment machine. The Establishment Machine is an amalgam of multiple power structures. It insists there is one narrative – a mile wide and an inch deep. These include but are not limited to, Wall Street, and the one party machine which is comprised of the conservative wing of Wall Street (the republicans) and the liberal wing (the democrats), the establishment media, the lobbyists, the lawyers, the imperial adventurism of the Military Industrial Complex, and of course the whore house that is Capitol Hill.

There is no denying that the uneasy and corrupt coalition between the two wings of the Wall Street Party – the Clintonian liberalism and the Wall Street wing of the republicans – resulted in the destruction of the working class and what was left of the middle class. The Wall Street Party talked out of both sides of its mouth – the polite side of the conservatives spoke about family values while offering coded support for the Klan and the fascists. The liberal wing of the Wall Street Party spoke about being a friend to the middle class while offering coded support for the union busting pirates moving jobs overseas.

But, and this is crucial, Bill Clinton was elected with a minority of the popular vote. Ross Perot, the beta version of Trump, won 19% of the vote. It is easy to define Clinton as only a triangulating soulless party hack but that requires buying the establishment media narrative. The establishment media controlled the narrative of the 90s and was a tool of the Wall Street Party. To contradict the media was to lose the election. In an era before smartphones and a nascent internet, to tell the truth was to be Walter Mondale.

It is hard to remember now but the police beating of Rodney King was essentially the beginning of the personal technology revolution. The beating was filmed by someone with a hand-held camcorder. Today when essentially everyone has a phone and that makes everyone essentially their own television news station, the recording of the cops beating Rodney King was first. None of which absolves the Clintons from throwing Black Americans to the wolves in order to win the election. That in turn does not absolve corporatists and the foot soldiers of the right who created and maintain a system of apartheid which left the democrats with two choices – lose and be noble, or win ugly.

Castigating the Clintons for winning ugly elides the brutal truth of the Reaganite counter revolution. The Reaganites and later the Bush-Cheney junta, were as inherently fascistic as Trump but it was the fascism of Wall Street with the nativist cadres contained. Trump turned that coalition on its head but it is the same coalition except under Trump the Klan and the nativist fascists are out in front.

Which brings us to the present. The Wall Street Party has created a political version of the 2008 crash. Trump is to politics as the crash of Lehman Brothers was to Wall Street. A self destructive gotterdammerung that is both suicidal and homicidal. Trumpism with assistance from the FBI, the Russians, the democrats, the media, and the collapsed economic gulag, won the election but not the popular vote. Trump is the titular head of a violent minority cadre. The Clintons were the titular heads of a majority that had no soul.

The destruction of the working class, the forced ghettoization of minorities (based on color, class and sex and sexual orientation) has created a new political class. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is the public face of that demographic reality. But the machine has not vanished.

In a previous post we mentioned that Springsteen’s line, “I got debts no honest man can pay” may very well be the title of America’s social reality for the last several decades. But that title has a bipolar nature. On the one hand it represents and speaks to the soul of those for whom capitalism has been a con and as a result they turn towards Bernie Sanders and the faith that a true political and social alternative to capitalism can be manifested. But then there are the others for whom those debts are the fuel for rage towards illusions. Jews shall not replace us is tattooed on their souls.

The Old South, the violent anti-union thugs, the silent majority that supported the fascism of Nixon, did not ever go away; they just stopped appearing on television except for establishment rhetorical target practice.* This is the smug hollow triumphalism that surrounded Obama. “We” elected a Black man, therefore all is forgiven, forgotten and let’s think about tomorrow. Even Obama himself, per his court-assistant, Ben Rhodes, seems surprised that tribalism still exists in America. Perhaps, Obama muses, I was ten years too soon. Maureen Dowd, who fell out of James Joyce’s back pocket, was right when she intoned from the dull dead pages of the New York Times, that what was revealed in that statement was nothing less than Obama’s messianic self regard. When the truth is he left the party in disarray with no fundraising, no successors and no chance to win. He knew the Russians were involved but he chose to be cautious. No doubt he would say the Clintons didn’t want his help and he would be right but let’s not forget that he didn’t do himself or the party any favors when after a gossamer 18 months in the senate he sat on Teddy Kennedy’s lap and said you can be my political daddy.

We cannot make the mistake and assume that this fetid machine with its contradictions and blood feuds is going to be swept away by Ocasio-Cortez. We cannot make the mistake of assuming it won’t be as clearly a tide is rising and one district in one corner of New York is not an anomaly though it is not the totality of the nation.

Casio-Cortez is young, telegenic, charismatic, and shrewd enough to stay on message – which means, jobs, healthcare, jobs, healthcare, jobs and there’s no need to mention Trump by name.

For now. Walking the streets of New York for votes is one thing. National politics is that but it is also the machine. That means either genuine opposition backed by the threat of civil disobedience or it means ugly compromise. The ugly truth of Blairism is that the revolutionary spine of the Labor Party was torn out with the change to the party platform. Under Blair Labor abandoned its commitment to revolution and the abolition of capitalism and instead embraced the liberal wing of Wall Street-ism. This is part of what’s waiting for Ocasio-Cortez.

Ocasio-Cortez has in the wake of her stunning win been very careful to stay on message. She has been right to do so and has indicated that her goal is the creation of a Left wing caucaus that can force the neoliberals of the Pelosi wing to compromise and support the Left agenda. This includes, single payer healthcare, free college (which is not free but paid for by the equitable distribution of taxes) and a commitment to rolling back the draconian neo-fascist power of the post 9/11 Orwellian police state.

It is no accident that she is a woman, and Latina. These are demographic truths that cannot and should not be ignored. She is a millennial candidate. She is a feminist without having to say she is a feminist. She is Latina and the “Browning of America” is a fact inherent in her reality but also in the reality of Trump’s bigotry as a response to her truth.

Thus, Ocasio-Cortez has won – an opportunity to walk on the razor’s edge. On one side are the soulless Wall Street liberals. On the other the soulless Wall Street conservatives. In front of her are the fascists.

To the millions who did not vote, out of indifference, as well as to those who voted with a smug assurance that victory was to be purchased off the shelf, you may have believed that you could be uninterested in history, but make no mistake, history has not lost interest in you. History knocked on the door yesterday. It has Brown skin, it’s female, and its young. History is also a fat white bastard full of fear and rage and crippled by insecurities. The better angels may or may not heed our call.

If the line is busy, then get off your ass and go find them.

The Times won’t change without your help.

 

*Which is not to say right wing goons like New Gingrich weren’t front and center but it is to say that Gingrich was given a fresh coat of paint by the corporate media which refused to describe him as a reactionary and a neo-fascist. It is no accident that Gingrich’s brief years of triumph occurred in the era before smartphones and the ubiquity of the internet as agents of potential disruption to corporate media.*

*This, in turn is not to forget or dismiss the fact that this is being written on a slave manufactured, government sanctioned tracking device.

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8 comments on “Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Versus The Machine.

  1. I understand the urgency of the moment. I’ve written about this. Some people feel this urgency and others don’t. And until enough people do, there is nothing to be done. So, the question is how to throw off enough sparks that might turn into a wildfire.

    On the other hand, my only optimism is in the long term, likely beyond my meager lifetime. I see the patterns stretching back generations and centuries. The present didn’t come out of nowhere.

    “Castigating the Clintons for winning ugly elides the brutal truth of the Reaganite counter revolution. The Reaganites and later the Bush-Cheney junta, were as inherently fascistic as Trump but it was the fascism of Wall Street with the nativist cadres contained. Trump turned that coalition on its head but it is the same coalition except under Trump the Klan and the nativist fascists are out in front.”

    As I noted elsewhere, before Reagan there was Jimmy Carter’s politicized religion and proto-Reaganomics. And before Nixon, there was FDR’s corporatism, labor-busting, and internment camps. Et cetera. Democrats have played this role this past century, long before the Clinton power grab.

    During eras of change, it has always been independent and third party movements forcing change. That is how the original Red Republicans became the new main party. And that is how the lower classes organized in the early-to-mid 20th century, until COINTELPRO destroyed grassroots movements and the two-party stranglehold became entrenched.

    Politicians in both main parties have only ever reacted to change already happening. The two main parties can’t be taken over, if history is to be our guide. But they can be pushed and cajoled toward compliance or, failing that, they can be replaced.

    Like

    1. rauldukeblog says:

      Essentially we’re in agreement.

      I believe there are some tactical moves that would work (at least or until COINTELPRO 2.0 is activated or activated to a greater degree than in its current form)

      https://theviolentink.blog/2018/07/01/the-soft-signs-of-the-resistance/

      This of course would require genuine leadership on the “Left” and organization – two things currently missing.

      AOC for all her political charm is not that person.

      And there’s no one else.

      Historically of course while it’s banal to say revolutions consume themselves the fact is they do. If they are genuine. there’s no escaping the inevitable violence. What’s always left out of the equation is that the violence is not endemic to revolution per se but that the violence of revolutions are endemic to the refusal of the establishment to change which forces the opposition to resort to violence to achieve its aims.

      None of which means you’re wrong – in fact your points are all valid.

      Back in ’75 Hunter S. did a lengthy piece on Carter. He was stunned when at a press conference Carter defended someone accused of murder based on the premise of the system being utterly corrupt and then referenced a Dylan song – at length – to support his argument.

      Thompson concluded Carter was the genuine article.

      He subsequently admitted he was very wrong – as Carter’s bizarre combo of proto-Regan tics and messianic impulses manifested. People conveniently forget it was Carter who pushed for deregulation and funding for a host of weapons programs. All Regan 101.

      The Clintons and Obama are all essentially reflections of the same systemic dilemmas – the corporate dictatorship rules the empire. They control the media and the media controls the (sham) debate.

      Part of the enormous and growing social tension is down to the Trojan Horse aspect of the technology “revolution” in which per Eastern Europe in the late 80s – individuals have the means o search for their own information, disseminate that information, and create alternative narratives.

      The establishment is naturally increasingly alarmed and lashing out.

      Trump’s “fake news” is of course classic fascist “big lie” tactics but increasingly I think it’s a symptom of a point of friction where the system is vulnerable.

      (This is a rough idea so bare with me).

      I don’t have much faith that the “left” can gets it’s shit together to effect change on the scale necessary.

      My idea of a “postmodern” general strike in which x number of people stop using their smartphones long enough to impact the economy is more or less Quixotic at best and hopeless at worst.

      But there is a narrow opening there that might get wider. In other words, it’s taking the Bus Boycott and updating it.

      of course the great hole in my idea is the Bus Boycott had a dynamic one in a generation leader – and that ended in catastrophe all the same.

      And yet, the social earthquake is clearly rumbling. It will sputter and explode annd sputter and explode – in part because the country is too large for one cohesive national movement and because the Stasi are effective at disruption.

      Personally I post to avoid utter despair. It’s all almost certainly hopeless but I have a cat who depends on me and if I stepped in front of a train he’d be screwed.

      And of course “History” is also a Trickster and as such essentially anything is possible. If the soviet union could collapse so can the US – very different systems and yet, so what?

      One of my favorite moments in history is on the eve of the overthrow of the monarchy a crowd marched on Versailles and louis viewing them from a high window asked his minister Talleyrand if it was a riot.

      No sire, he said, it is not a riot, it is a revolution.

      And I say that with both amusement and dread.

      Things seem unlikely to end well but getting rid of Trump could easily bring something worse and there’s always the truth of – be careful what you wish for – as the “triumph” of the “left” is no guarantee of things being “better,”

      I’ll revisit this and post more.

      Like

      1. You threw out a lot for me to chew on.

        “Historically of course while it’s banal to say revolutions consume themselves the fact is they do. If they are genuine. there’s no escaping the inevitable violence. What’s always left out of the equation is that the violence is not endemic to revolution per se but that the violence of revolutions are endemic to the refusal of the establishment to change which forces the opposition to resort to violence to achieve its aims.”

        I basically agree with that. But I would further emphasize the separation of revolution and violence.

        Revolution originally meant a major shift, having been an astrological term referring to cycles. There was never anything inherently violent about it, other than those in power or seeking power often respond violently to change. The change itself, though, is an unstoppable force as that is the way reality operates — nothing remains the same forever.

        Still, we could always choose peaceful transition. And indeed some societies have chosen it while avoiding all violence. It can be done and, if enough people in our society wanted it, we too could do it. The problem is our society has always been enamored with violence. We not only are a country founded on revolution but one founded explicitly on violence.

        It’s for that reason I’d rather avoid revolution. The chances of our keeping revolution nonviolent is approximately zero. That is why I find it so disturbing and disheartening that the ruling elite are so cavalier and the public so apathetic. We are blindly walking right into catastrophe, not because we are choosing it but because we refuse to admit that there is a choice, which is to say we are choosing it by default.

        “Back in ’75 Hunter S. did a lengthy piece on Carter. He was stunned when at a press conference Carter defended someone accused of murder based on the premise of the system being utterly corrupt and then referenced a Dylan song – at length – to support his argument.”

        That is interesting.

        Back then he was saying the system was corrupt. More recently, during Obama’s administration, he stated we no longer had a functioning democracy. But why didn’t and doesn’t he use his power to do something about it? After all, a former president has immense influence. It’s the same thing with Eisenhower warning us about the military-industrial complex when he was leaving office and yet, while in office, he played along with the military-industrial complex.

        It gets tiresome. Do these powerful men not take seriously their own assessments and warnings? If they did take their own words as though they meant something, they would be going to great lengths to push for the radical reforms that are the last possible avoidance of violent revolution. Instead, they do nothing. It’s as if they speak the truth on occasion merely to console their own bad consciences.

        “My idea of a “postmodern” general strike in which x number of people stop using their smartphones long enough to impact the economy is more or less Quixotic at best and hopeless at worst.”,

        Yeah. I agree with that. I try to live according to my values. And I make decisions accordingly. I stopped doing business with Amazon, not because I thought I’m going to personally take down a global corporate giant but because I simply didn’t want to be part of their shittiness any more. But obviously, a genuine economic challenge would have to go toward major strikes that could grind everything to a halt.

        Living in this society, we are all part of the shittiness. That is the conundrum I’ve contemplated as an imperial subject at the heart of the empire, as this situation complicates everything with the benefits of an imperial subject (cheap goods, basic security, bread and circus, etc). The American colonists at least had geographic distance of a vast ocean between them and the seat of power, allowing a greater sense of autonomy and bravado.

        The French Revolution probably is a better model for our present situation. We are dealing with a crude and corrupt government that is much more immediate in our lives. We are an occupied people, not a far-flung colony. If and when revolution erupts now, it will blow up.

        “And yet, the social earthquake is clearly rumbling. It will sputter and explode and sputter and explode – in part because the country is too large for one cohesive national movement and because the Stasi are effective at disruption.”

        That is a new dynamic, the size of the country and population. In the end, there is far more that divides Americans than unites us, despite claims to the contrary. The United States is the detritus of several former empires, all mixed together. We aren’t a people controlled through direct force so much as through constant division and, as you say, disruption. It’s a less violent method as used elsewhere in the world, not seeking to win wars and dominate governments so much as to destabilize populations and entire regions.

        “Personally I post to avoid utter despair. It’s all almost certainly hopeless but I have a cat who depends on me and if I stepped in front of a train he’d be screwed.”

        Sounds like me. I too have a cat depending on me. She is getting old now, having reached her 20s. After she is gone, no one will depend on me, other than maybe my parents as they too are aging.

        Thomas Paine had the advantage of having lost nearly everything and so it was easier for him to put everything on the line, hence easier for him to complain about Summer Soldiers who were those small farmers who had to return home to harvest their crops and feed their families. He was alone in the world. But for someone like me, life is maybe too comfortable. I get by, if only barely. And I’m surrounded by family and friends.

        “And of course “History” is also a Trickster and as such essentially anything is possible. If the soviet union could collapse so can the US – very different systems and yet, so what?”

        I suspect that the US might collapse more dramatically than the Soviet Union. The Soviets were more or less trying to rebuild the old Russian Empire. There was a historical precedent built on ethnicity and geography. The US is entirely different in that it’s cobbled together by ideas. Those ideas happen to be powerful but ultimately they are just ideas.

        “Things seem unlikely to end well but getting rid of Trump could easily bring something worse and there’s always the truth of – be careful what you wish for – as the “triumph” of the “left” is no guarantee of things being “better,””

        That is why I don’t focus as much on Trump in isolation. I don’t think he means much on his own terms. He is a tool of the system, even if a dangerous tool that has gotten out of control. Still, it is the hand that wielded or attempted to wield that tool that scares me. As for “triumph” of the “left”, I can’t comprehend what that might mean. What is left of the left?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. rauldukeblog says:

        Brilliant comments. will respond in depth shortly!

        Like

  2. I must admit that I fear and despise the Democrats far more than the Republicans. Reactionaries react. That is what they do. But what they are reacting to has been largely created and supported by Democrats who, in complicity, deserve much of the blame. Every election, we were offered a choice of supposed lesser evils which in reality were always two greater evils. And so with every election, the evil grew worse, more powerful and entrenched.

    It was always the Democrats who offered cover by defending against the left and pushing right. This left the field open for right-wingers who took advantage of it, but that is what the neocon Clintonites wanted without having to claim it as their own. In this sense, fascism is more likely to come from the Democrats than the Republicans, and even now many Democratic ruling elite see this as a situation they can work to their cynical advantage. They want a fascism, as long as they think they can control it. Or else hold it out as a constant threat to keep everyone in line. It’s a cynical and dangerous game they play, and it will eventually blow up in their faces.

    I fear the Democrats with every cell in my body and I don’t trust them further than I could throw them off a cliff. If not for Trump right now, there would be no resistance as the Democrats would have pushed us even further right. A Trump administration, in showing the game for what it is and always has been, at least forces us to admit what has been going on for a long time in both parties. Americans are beginning to wise up, the reason democratic socialists are suddenly getting attention. It’s the entire system that is the enemy of the people. This might be our last chance to seek a new direction.

    http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2018/06/28/hitlers-rise-it-can-happen-here/

    “With evident fatigue, the baker reported, “One had no time to think. There was so much going on.” His account was similar to that of one of Mayer’s colleagues, a German philologist in the country at the time, who emphasized the devastatingly incremental nature of the descent into tyranny and said that “we had no time to think about these dreadful things that were growing, little by little, all around us.” The philologist pointed to a regime bent on diverting its people through endless dramas (often involving real or imagined enemies), and “the gradual habituation of the people, little by little, to being governed by surprise.” In his account, “each step was so small, so inconsequential, so well explained or, on occasion, ‘regretted,’” that people could no more see it “developing from day to day than a farmer in his field sees the corn growing. One day it is over his head.”

    “Focusing largely on 1933, in Defying Hitler Haffner offers a radically different picture, in which the true nature of Nazism was evident to many Germans from the start. Just twenty-five years old that year and studying law with the goal of becoming a judge or administrator, he describes the mounting effects of Nazism on the lives of his high-spirited friends and fellow students, who were preoccupied with fun, job prospects, and love affairs. Haffner says that as soon as the Nazis took power, he was saved by his capacity to smell the rot […]

    “As Haffner describes it, a form of terror began quickly, as members of the SS made their presence felt, intimidating people in public places. At the same time, citizens were distracted by an endless stream of festivities and celebrations. The intimidation, accompanied by the fervent, orchestrated pro-Nazi activity, produced an increase in fear, which led many skeptics to become Nazis. Nonetheless, people flirted, enjoyed romances, “went to the cinema, had a meal in a small wine bar, drank Chianti, and went dancing together.” Sounding here like Mayer’s subjects, Haffner writes that it was the “automatic continuation of ordinary life” that “hindered any lively, forceful reaction against the horror.”

    “In Haffner’s telling, the collapse of freedom and the rule of law occurred in increments, some of which seemed to be relatively small and insignificant. In 1933, when Nazi officers stood menacingly outside Jewish shops, Jews were merely “offended. Not worried or anxious. Just offended.” But Haffner insists that Hitler’s brutality and the ongoing politicization of everyday life were clear from the outset. In the early days of the regime, a self-styled republican advised him to avoid skeptical comments, which would be of no use: “I think I know the fascists better than you. We republicans must howl with the wolves.” […]

    “In their different ways, Mayer, Haffner, and Jarausch show how habituation, confusion, distraction, self-interest, fear, rationalization, and a sense of personal powerlessness make terrible things possible. They call attention to the importance of individual actions of conscience both small and large, by people who never make it into the history books. Nearly two centuries ago, James Madison warned: “Is there no virtue among us? If there be not, we are in a wretched situation. No theoretical checks—no form of government can render us secure.” Haffner offered something like a corollary, which is that the ultimate safeguard against aspiring authoritarians, and wolves of all kinds, lies in individual conscience: in “decisions taken individually and almost unconsciously by the population at large.” “

    Liked by 1 person

    1. rauldukeblog says:

      My most recent post mentions how Hindenburg brought in Hitler because the one thing they all could agree on was defeating the left.

      The dems made a devil’s bargain with Wall Street and one can’t forget the exponential growth and power of the Stasi and their ability to manipulate and enforce.

      This is true, depressing, and daming:

      “I fear the Democrats with every cell in my body and I don’t trust them further than I could throw them off a cliff. If not for Trump right now, there would be no resistance as the Democrats would have pushed us even further right. A Trump administration, in showing the game for what it is and always has been, at least forces us to admit what has been going on for a long time in both parties.”

      Pelosi is just an awful person. Given the chance to publicly endorse AOC and to build a bridge towards the left she instead was shrill, defensive, vindictive, and small.

      But she was also showing her fangs. She’s as much of a threat as the republicans and ultimately is on Trump’s side vs the left.

      Jefferson Morley has just written a biography of infamous CIA spook James J. Angleton and has been in a lawsuit vs the CIA for about 15+ years.

      In the course of it he discovered that the CIA had planted a spy inside the commissions looking into the CIA’s role in the assassination of JFK.

      It’s hardly the only example of such machinations.

      Add into that the power of assorted Koch Bro billionaires with their private armies of fixers, lawyers and genuine thugs and then add in the plague of fundraising and seedy world of DC bribes, blackmail, affairs, addictions, and so on and we really are talking about a gangsterocracy that is not so very different from Germany in the 30s or Italy in the 20s.

      I remind myself as often as possible that Mussolini was on the payroll of British intelligence for years before the war.

      And I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s a file somewhere in a vault beneath Langley or some such place with Trump’s name on it.

      I mention this because I agree about the dems. The system is rotten and they are clearly a parallel to the bourgeois establishment of Germany – corrupt, anti-left, and all too willing to use violence to stifle the opposition and prop up the system.

      This quote makes that clear:

      “In their different ways, Mayer, Haffner, and Jarausch show how habituation, confusion, distraction, self-interest, fear, rationalization, and a sense of personal powerlessness make terrible things possible. ”

      But there’s also this: “They call attention to the importance of individual actions of conscience both small and large, by people who never make it into the history books”

      I was stunned to discover recently that there was a 3 week riot/occupation of a major university in Germany during the war by protestors fighting the regime’s attempts to force women to leave school.

      On the other hand – clearly the menace of the SS finds a parallel in the spectre of mass shootings.

      https://theviolentink.blog/2018/02/22/the-language-of-fascism-and-civil-war-the-nra-and-mass-shootings/

      The gist of my post Las Vegas shooting was/is that the threat of such actions is an assault on the idea/ideal of the public commons – the bedrock of a “free” society. It is a tactic of extreme right wing intimidation and the rhetoric of LaPierre and the NRA is essentially Hitler-esque: the elite, the metropolitan elite, the media, etc are out to get “the people” – the tribe – and they have to be resisted.

      What a fucking mess.

      Moe to follow as I still have a response to your post about the nature of “revolution” in the historical/natural process.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The larger context is that this is far from being limited to fascism. We are dealing with a whole host of catastrophes. They overlap and exacerbate one another. A major factor is the environmental damage, another slow change that we humans ignore or simply can’t comprehend. And of course, this has everything to do with corporate power and propaganda.

        https://smallpondscience.com/2018/07/01/the-power-of-dismissal/

        “I knew it would be different on my third trip to the reef last week. I’m shocked at how it was different, and how it was not. The experience for everybody on the boat seemed to be entirely the same. Even though the reef was not. I’m just reeled by the human capacity to accept a business-as-usual scenario, even though this is a trajectory towards disaster. […]

        “If we can’t collectively force action to limit carbon emissions, we are no different than the fish that I saw on the Great Barrier Reef, clinging to a mass of bleached coral hoping that things might magically turn for the better.”

        Liked by 1 person

      2. rauldukeblog says:

        This is where I begin to despair.

        I’m not sure how even if serious action was taken now, the collapse of the environment can be avoided. It seems too far gone but as I’m not a scientist I’m willing to be persuaded that there’s still a chance.

        On the political side I’m in favor of treating environmental collapse as a crime against humanity and that perpetrators should be treated accordingly. Of course one could probably count on one hand the number of war criminals who ever saw the inside of a court room let alone a jail.

        Liked by 1 person

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